Fossil fuel subsidies fall in gain for renewables

Fossil fuel subsidies fall in gain for renewables

Countries from Mexico to Germany and Malaysia are increasingly taking advantage of cheap oil by trimming fossil-fuel subsidies, easing the way for renewable power that can help the environment, according to the chief economist of the International Energy Agency.

With the global cost of crude cut by more than half, Fatih Birol said the IEA has scrapped a forecast that had subsidies reaching $660 billion by 2020. In the group’s latest report, fossil fuel producers were paid $548 billion in 2013, a $26.5 billion decline that was the first drop in four years.

At least 27 nations are decreasing or ending the subsidies that hold down costs for fuels used to generate electricity, including coal and natural gas, the IEA reported in November. That’s adding momentum to global efforts to limit greenhouse gases by increasing the use of clean energy.

Source: Bloomberg

Date: February 2015

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