If all the ice melted

If all the ice melted

National Geographic has produced several maps showing the world as the world’s coastlines are now, with only one difference: all the ice on land has melted and drained into the sea, raising it 216 feet and creating new shorelines for our continents and inland seas.

There are more than five million cubic miles of ice on Earth, and some scientists say it would take more than 5,000 years to melt it all. If we continue adding carbon to the atmosphere, we’ll very likely create an ice-free planet, with an average temperature of perhaps 80 degrees Fahrenheit instead of the current 58.

 

Source: National Geographic

Date: September 2015

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Tags assigned to this article:
climate changeenvironmentfossil fuelsinfographic

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