Small islands, big moves: renewable off-grid solutions across the sea

Small islands, big moves: renewable off-grid solutions across the sea

Summer is here! As you might read this story in your office, how about a virtual trip to some beautiful islands? Put on your sunglasses and hop with us from Samsø (Denmark) over to Tilos (Greece) and then to El Hierro (Spain), three islands championing renewable energy deployment.

Because of their isolated position and their separation from the “mainland”, islands tend to depend on fossil fuel imports to get the energy they need. However, their easy access to renewable sources such as wind and wave energy presents an enormous potential.

Initiatives such as GREENCAP are already promoting viable solutions, trying to capitalize on the technical and scientific results of its modular projects community in the Renewable Energy Sources field within the Mediterranean area. Additionally, the European Commission, in May last year, launched the Clean Energy for EU Islands Initiative together with 14 European States. The initiative aims to provide a long-term framework to help islands generate their own sustainable, low-cost energy.

Through the Renewable Networking Platform, we came across these three very inspiring islands in Denmark, Greece and Spain: Samsø, Tilos and El Hierro are reaching their full energy potential one step at a time.

Source: Energy Cities

Date: July 2018

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Tags assigned to this article:
energy policyislandsrenewables

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